Top 4 Reason Why Xbox One Won't Be Able To Beat PS4 Ever

Recently speaking to BizJournals, Ed Fries has explained why in his opinion PlayStation 4 is ahead in the next-gen console war and most probably will win it. For those who might not know him, Ed Fries has led the team that created the first Xbox in 2001, leaving Microsoft only in 2004 when the project saw the daylight. “I think it's PS4 by a nose”, Fries said talking about who's winning the console war. “The two sides say nice things about each other; they compliment each other's cool games. It looks to me like most of the excitement is kind of over in the console war for this generation. It looks like Microsoft is gaining a little traction back, but PS4 got a really early lead that will be hard for Microsoft to catch."

Xbox One vs PS4

Ed Fries thinks things won't change unless augmented and virtual reality devices won't have a huge impact on video games. Then, Microsoft could have a good comeback with HoloLens, that looks like a great piece of hardware with a wide range of gaming applications.

Now, I invite you to take a look at those four reasons why PlayStation 4 will seemingly beat Xbox One in the next-gen console war. Later on we will discuss also the reasons why Microsoft could have a great reaction and win that war, too, so don't worry about our impartiality.

INITIAL MICROSOFT'S FOCUS ON ENTERTAINMENT

Do you recall Xbox One's boring presentation event? It was almost all “TV, TV, TV”, “Sports, sports, sports” and disappointed gamers around the world who were eagerly waiting for Microsoft to introduce its next-gen vision for the gaming industry. On top of that, at the end of the event it was revealed Xbox One was going to have an annoying always-online DRM to contrast piracy. It was devastating for players and many still keep that bad impression until today, or until the day they have to choose a next-gen console: at least, that's what sales data state…

COMEBACK CAME TOO LATE

Phil Spencer arrived at the helm of Xbox one year after Xbox One launched, taking Don Mattrick's role. From that day, he commanded a complete shift in focus from entertainment to gaming, and results are slowly coming to Microsoft's attention. While we are happy about this shift, it could have arrived too late to bring Xbox One ahead of PlayStation 4, after that Sony's console has led sales charts for a year and more.

LESS REVENUES AFTER PRICE SLASHES

And even if Microsoft should reach its target, beating in terms of sold units Sony and PlayStation 4, Xbox One could have been not that great business achievement they were expecting. Xbox One got priced $499,99, $100,00 more than PlayStation 4, and that was a disastrous move especially considering that Xbox 360 was less expensive than PlayStation 3 and that was among the reasons why it was so competitive during the old-gen console war. Microsoft took note of that mistake and tried, with the arrival of Phil Spencer at the helm of Xbox division, to shake things up offering bundles and “not permanent” price slashes that reduced revenues by 24% in the last financial quarter. Not a great deal, huh?

COMPETITIVE PORTFOLIO DIDN'T LEAD TO VICTORY

Xbox One's software portfolio has been so much better than PlayStation 4's in the last couple of years. The only unanimously appreciated PS4 exclusive game was Bloodborne and, as you might know, From Software's title is even so accessible to become a killer application or a massive success. On the other hand, Microsoft has had a great launch line-up and a few titles that made this generation of consoles finally meaningful (Forza Horizon 2, Sunset Overdrive, etc.). And Xbox One will be even better this holiday season with Forza Motorsport 6, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Halo 5: Guardians and more.

Has this been useful in terms of sales? Nope. PlayStation 4 is well ahead and Sony doesn't even need to launch good titles at this point because it's going to sell well anyway. I wonder what will happen when first-party masterpieces as Uncharted 4: A Thief's End or acclaimed games like Gran Turismo 6 are out.