Pokemon Go: New Price Listing Called “Ticket” Found At In-App Purchases On iTunes

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A new price listing has been spotted on Pokémon Go at iTunes.

In Pokémon Go, players can use real-world money to purchase PokéCoins. PokéCoins are in-game currencies that players can use to get more supplies like Poké Balls and potions. You can also use coins to buy customization for your gamer profile.

Joe Merrick from Serebii shared on Twitter that a new price listing has been found for the game on iTunes. The image that Merrick shared has a listing of all possible in-app purchases for Pokémon Go on iTunes. The list includes all the PokéCoins bundles that players can purchase, as well as special trainer boxes.

However, the last thing on the list is entirely new. Simple called the Ticket; it is listed at £7.99, which is around 10 dollars in the USA. Nothing is official, but according to Merrick the datamines for the game seemed to suggest that the Ticket may be related to a possible future special event that will be time-sensitive.

Joe Merrick on Twitter

If so, this sets a dangerous precedent for events going forward with Pokémon GO. I’m honestly highly conflicted about this because it’s outright gating people out if they don’t play. I need to wait and see for full official reveal before making a complete judgement, however.

Up till now, Pokémon Go hasn’t had any events locked behind a paywall. While certain events required players to accomplish challenging conditions, they were always free to any player who is willing to put the time and effort. This potential upcoming event that requires the Ticket to gain access may still be free, as long as players can reach the requirements in-game. The Ticket listing on iTunes may be for players who are willing to use real-world money to skip the necessary conditions, and automatically get access to the event.

Merrick feels conflicted about the possibility of players being able to purchase tickets for events. He thinks that the Ticket will gate people out of playing the game, forcing people to use real-world money to keep up with everything in the game. With the recent controversy with the microtransactions in Mario Kart Tour, Nintendo’s mobile games have been pushing microtransactions in directions that most fans find unfavorably.